Purpose Driven Collaboration

Series 9/14: Grass Route Social Innovation – Understanding the road towards integrating genuine grassroots social innovation into sustainable development.

Mini Series 1/4: Enterprising Collaboration – The series investigates how collaboration and partnership can empower us to build a resilient and sustainable future.

EDSI Models

The New Year is a time to reflect and set goals and challenges for the year ahead. It’s a great time to revisit what drives you and develop your personal mission statement. Identifying your passion and purpose in life will help you accomplish more than you ever expected in the year ahead. It will enable you to not just set yearly resolution but wake up every morning with fresh insight. How does purpose drive our ability to connect and collaborate? At the heart of social innovation is purpose, it’s the ability of the designer to connect their passion with social issues. Although we are all uniquely created we often respond to social issues with similar solutions. This leads to international trends throughout society in response to social challenges. How can social innovator connect and collaborate?

Human Centred Design (HCD) and organic growth is often contrary to scalability, the solutions are designed to work for a specific community. Collaboration is then key to develop the solution to have a wider impact. Collaboration is not about enforcing your design as the best standard but instead working with other designer to help them grow their own solutions. This is the way organic growth can scale and set about innovation in knowledge bases and technologies that can be adapted and used globally. As such collaboration in HCD is not about promoting the result but the process and enabling other to learn from and be empowered by the process.

Ashoka is an organisation that recognises the ability for any individual to be a change maker and has created a global network of social innovators in order to map out and understand social trends. In creating this network Ashoka can empower change makers to have a higher impact on society by connecting with piers and challenging their perception and understanding of the problem. Ashoka provides a platform for its members to really understand their purpose and strength and what they can bring to the innovative process. Part of the journey of a social entrepreneur is realising your own limitation, not trying to solve the whole problem but instead focusing on a part of the problem you can solve; this enables the designer to set achievable and measurable goals.

Collaboration needs to be driven by our purpose, through our shared passion and vision we can connect and in our different skills sets and perspectives we can grow and be challenged. The more we develop ourselves and understand our purpose the more we can connect and collaborate with each other. Understanding our role within the design process is critical in working together, developing our own personal mission statement is empowering and will enable us to collaborate and connect for the right reasons.

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Designing Sustainably: “Do not Harm” Principle

Series 5/14: Grass Route Social Innovation – Understanding the road towards integrating genuine grassroots social innovation into sustainable development.

Mini Series 2/2: Peace and Conflict Resolution – The following series will research the themes of Peace and conflict resolution in order to understand how they relate to sustainable development.

Connectors Dividers

Peace and conflict resolution is an integral part of achieving sustainable development. The absence of physical and cultural violence provides a safe place to work together and design a more sustainable future. However to achieve a long term sustainable vision we need to move away from traditional structures which promote business as usual, and unsustainable growth. To achieve this we must bring about structural change through the principles of Peacebuilding. Designers shape the environment in which we live, it is therefore important to apply Peacebuilding within Design. If designers can grasp these concepts, we will be able to build a culture of Peace and sustainability within our environment. What are the principles of Peace and Conflict resolution and who can they be applied within the design process?

The founding principle of peace and conflict resolution is the Do not Harm principal. Do not Harm is the consideration off the holistic environment within the design and its sustainable impact. This is a central concept to sustainable development and leads the designer towards the Human Centred Design process. Do not Harm is about asking the community if they have a solution to the challenge, and building an understanding of the environmental limitation with the community. To achieve this practically we must understand the different Connectors and Dividers within the community. Connectors are the structures that bring the community together; a sustainable design needs to build on these connectors in order to connect with the potential of the community. Dividers are the structures that bring about conflict within the community; design must address these dividers to design a resilient solution. If the design at any time negatively impact on the Connectors or introduces conflict to the community then the designer needs to consider alternative options.T

hese principles are in essence already applied into the construction industry through the way we manage Health and Safety. Over the last decade the UK construction industry has strived towards Zero Casualties, ensuring all staff get home safely at the end of each day. To achieve this we have built up a Health and Safety culture into the design process; from conceptual design through to the construction and demolition. At each stage we consider the risk and alternative options to reduce the risk. The same methods are applied in order to understand our environmental impact, there is however a limited integration of the social impact throughout the design process. The theory of connectors and dividers could enable the construction industry to build the Do not Harm principle into the design process. This would enable us to go beyond ensuring Zero Casualties and enable us to build up design solutions which have a long term positive impact on society. How can we build these principles into engineering and enable designers to identify with these concepts?

Jenn was inspiring in her approach to peace and conflict resolution. As we challenged her in the practical application of Peace and Conflict resolution she was quite clear in knowing the limits of her knowledge. Jenn didn’t apply the theories if she didn’t understand the social environment in which she was designing. I have met some inspiring Health and Safety managers over the last year and the one trait that leads to excellent Health and Safety management is being aware of the risk and knowing that you cannot solve the challenge yourself. An excellent Health and Safety manager works on getting the staff on board with the solution. Peace and Conflict works in the same manner, Jenn understands that achieving a sustainable Peace is challenging and requires each of us individual to develop in our behaviour and attitude. Sustainable Development should apply the same principles in order to get the community on board with the design process. As designers we need to be aware of our limitation in achieving sustainable development. We need to be humble in the way we approach and work with the wider community. This will enable us to build up solution in which there is a wider understanding of the importance of sustainable development, in which we can capture the human resource within the design process.

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Building Long Term Sustainable Peace

Series 4/14: Grass Route Social Innovation – Understanding the road towards integrating genuine grassroots social innovation into sustainable development.

Mini Series 1/2: Peace and Conflict Resolution – The following series will research the themes of Peace and conflict resolution in order to understand how they relate to sustainable development.

Conflict Resolution

Designing with purpose is about leadership: self-leader defines how you identity as a designer and leadership defines how you connect with the community you are designing for. How do we build up relationships and work together to build a more sustainable future? To understand this concept we met with Jenn Weidmana deputy director of the Rotary Peace Centre. This first issue was defining peace, peace is complex and is more than just the lack of physical violence. Johan Galtung’s defines peace, using the conflict triangle, as the absence of physical violence, cultural violence and structural violence. The interesting part of the conflict triangle is the theory that peace can only be sustained if we can overcome all forms of violence. Structural violence creates barriers and inequality in society, if we don’t build up structural peace then all we will have is an unstable superficial peace. This concept is defined excellently in the Hebrew definition of the word Peace; Shalom defines peace as nothing missing and nothing broken. Understanding the real meaning of peace is an important part to building a better future together. Peace is about building prosperity and well-being, creating value which goes beyond monetary gain and economic growth. How do we achieve peace and how does it relate to sustainable development?

To create a sustainable and lasting peace we need to address all the elements of conflict. Physical violence can be addressed through behaviour change using Peacekeeping as a means to prevent conflict. Peacekeeping is not about forcing peace, the design of Peacekeeping is built on three key principles; the consent of all parties involved, impartiality of Peacekeeping forces and none use of force except in self defence and the defence of the mandate. Peacekeeping forces should be designed with the parties at conflict in order to create an empowering peace instead of creating a superficial and reprimanding peace. Cultural Violence is discrimination against different groups based on their identity, cultural violence can be addressed through a change in attitude. Peacemaking is about educating by building resilient power bases in which different cultural groups can communicate and build up relations. Structural conflict needs to address the contradiction in society removing social barriers and creating a more equal society. Peacebuilding creates a platform to enable a more equal society, it works on changing the very structure of society to encourage and empower the community to create sustainable growth. Each of these processes require theory of change to achieve sustained and resilient Peace, but how do we bring about these changes?

Power and influence are interesting and intangible concepts, to bring about change we need to create influence but how do we achieve this. To represent power Jenn started to draw an upside down triangle it was an unstable structure that was then supported by different power base; weapons, wealth, people… It was an interesting way of visualising power and the influence each of us have, the only reason power basses exist is because we let them. Theory of change is about recognising the influence we hold and how we can work together to create long term change. Human Centred Design is central to building a long term sustainable Peace and applying theory of change. Human Centred Design enables us to design and build up the three pillars of peace. Peacekeeping, Peacemaking and Peacebuilding requires community led initiatives to work; peace is all about building up relationships to create prosperity and well-being within society. Peace and conflict resolution is an important process to developing long term sustainable growth, what principles of peace and conflict resolution can be used in sustainable developement?

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Human Centred Design: it Starts with You

Series 3/14: Grass Route Social Innovation – Understanding the road towards integrating genuine grassroots social innovation into sustainable development.

Mini Series 3/3: Human Centred Design – The following series covers the concepts and ideas behind Human Centred Design?

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My wife is an artist, she is driven by the creativity design process. Everything she does is led by a passion to explore research and understand different ideas and concepts. Before I met my wife I could distinctly separate the idea of art and design. To me art was about expression and communicating your identity through a creative process, design contrary to art was about working for the end user and building up a solution to solve a challenge they are facing. With this definition of design don’t we lose the idea of ownership and responsibility? Is the challenge of designing with the community, first about understanding who you are as a designer? When I first met my wife I started to understand more about the design process, I started to work on my engineering designs as an artist would; taking ownership of the design and crafting the details. The more I understand who I was the more I enjoyed the process of design. I was less driven by the result; instead I saw the process as an opportunity to grow and learn and discover my own identity as a designer. Is the journey to achieving Human Centred Design therefore a journey of self-leadership?

This idea of self-leadership is central to the design process. It is required in order to understand and relate to the problem, it enables us to dig deeper and find the route cause developing a design which empowers the community. This part of the creative process is the empathy stage and in order to develop empathy you must know yourself and use emotional intelligence to relate to and understand the problem. Emotional intelligence enables us to connect with people and develop a genuine understanding of the impact of our designs. This was where my week in South East Asia started, it wasn’t in the excitement of discovering a different culture but in the reflection of understanding who I am as a designer. This first workshop was led by May Sripatanaskul founder of the Asian Leadership Academy. We started to learn more about empathy and how it fits within the design process. The workshop was a great insight into how empathy can build up the creative process and bring identity into design. How does defining your identity as a designer empower you in the design process?

May enabled us to understand the connected nature of the design process, how each piece of the puzzle fits together to create an innovative solution. The process of empathizing built up the understanding and passion to ideate; developing different potential solution. The more unrestrained the process was the more innovative we were in our approach. This was a central lesson in the Human Centred Design process; there is a time to be creative and a time to narrow down on the idea. The creative stage is about building up on ideas, using creativity to create. In order to achieve this we need to create a safe place for innovative thinking in which we can openly discuss different ideas. Understanding the creative process and the importance of following through the stages of the design is the first step to designing with impact. Human Centred Design starts with each one of us, it starts with understanding the way we relate to each other and how we can encourage and build each other up. Is the basis of sustainable development about building up relationships and working together to create a better future?

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The Sustainable Perspective

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Getting to do work experience in an area I was passionate about at a young age radically changed my level of passion and commitment. It enable me to have a completely different understanding of maths and physics and how they could be used practically to solve real world problems. Yet this fascination for the technical aspects of civil engineering was not the must memorable part of the work experience. One morning when I went into the office, my mentors set me the task of interviewing all the staff and finding out about their story. For a shy introvert this was a big challenge that had my fourteen year old self feeling rather disconcerted. What I learnt from this experience completely changed the way I look at my career.

During the interviews I asked each member if staff what they where passionate about, what role they played in the company and how they had got into that role. Each member of staff answered my questions in an open and honest manner. I came out of the experience with an understanding of who an engineering consultancy worked. How each individual played their role and had a purpose within their company. I also learnt about their purpose, their story and their passions. My mentor taught me about the diverse environment of engineering and the different disciplines involved in a consultancy. This taught me to always try and understand where engineering fits into the bigger picture. This has encouraged me to understand how different perspectives can help understand and overcome challenges.

Diversity is a word we through around a lot but what does it really mean and how can we create a more diverse engineering community? Diversity is about creating a workspace that is representative of society. This is vital for civil engineering as we work on solutions that shape the society in which we live. To create a real diversity within engineering we can’t just promote engineering as a career choice, we have to encourage people to bring their passions and interest into engineering. In doing so we can bring a wider perspective into engineering, and build up an innovative approach to the problems we are solving.

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